Phenology

Phenology Walk: October 21, 2013

Hunting season in Grand Teton National Park is open, which means gut piles will soon attract bears into the valley. Moose are moving into the sage flats as they shift their diet from willows to bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), and bull moose are particularly aggressive while they are in the rut (mating season).

Cow moose browsing at sunset, October 21, 2013

Cow moose browsing at sunset, October 21, 2013

Trumpeter Swans can be seen flying overhead, and  pronghorn are beginning to congregate and prepare for winter migration from Grand Teton National Park to the Upper Green River Valley of Wyoming. Pronghorn make the longest migration on land of any mammal in North America, with the route totaling 80 to 90 miles.

Sunset on Mt. Owen and Mt. Teewinot, October 21, 2013

Sunset on Mt. Owen and Mt. Teewinot, October 21, 2013

Snow has not been sticking in the valley, but there has been a dusting of snow on the mountains ever since the first snow of the season.

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